Grants-in-Aid

Chair

Members

  • J. Robert Burger
  • Bruce Butler
  • Chris J. Conroy
  • Thomas C. Giarla
  • Jacob R. Goheen
  • Peter Guiden
  • Greg D. Hartman
  • Virginia (Ginny) Hayssen
  • Andrew G. Hope
  • Angela Hornsby
  • Chris N. Jacques
  • Dawn M. Kaufman
  • Hayley C. Lanier
  • Peter Larsen
  • Bryan S. McLean
  • Stephen G. Mech
  • Melissa J. Merrick
  • Daniel K. Odell
  • Bret S. Pasche
  • Aaron W. Reed
  • Kevin C. Rowe
  • J. A. Soto-Centeno
  • Richard D. Stevens
  • Rob Swihart
  • Paul M. Velazco

History and Mission

The Grants-in Aid Committee was formed in 1971 (Gill and Wozencraft, 1994) to enhance and support graduate research by identifying and funding research proposals pertaining to mammals. Additionally, this committee nominates the outstanding graduate students that best meet the conditions and criteria set forth for the American Society of Mammalogists Fellowship and the Albert R. and Alma Shadle Fellowship.

2021 Albert R. and Alma Shadle Fellowship Recipient

The Albert R. and Alma Shadle Fellowship is awarded to a graduate student in recognition of current accomplishments and future potential in mammalogy. The 2021 recipient of the Albert R. and Alma Shadle award is Savannah Bartel of the University of Wisconsin. 

Savannah Bartel has been an active member of ASM since her first year of graduate school in 2017. She was a 2018 recipient of an ASM Grants-in-Aid of Research award that funded the fieldwork for 3 of her dissertation chapters. She has presented her research at every ASM meeting since her first meeting in 2018. She is also a member of ASM's Public Education committee. With the assistance of GIAR and Shadle Fellowship funding, she has led several papers on mammal behavior and plant-mammal interactions published in journals like Behavioral Ecology, Ecosphere, and Ecology Letters. She has also coauthored papers published in journals like Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and Trends in Ecology and Evolution. She is very passionate about mentoring the next generation of mammalogists and has mentored 9 undergraduate students.

Savannah's dissertation research broadly evaluates 1) how human disturbances and species interactions affect the foraging behavior of rodents, ungulates, and coyotes, and 2) how spatial patterns in mammal foraging behavior may explain spatial patterns in plant communities. Her GIAR-funded research found that the overlap of multiple past and present disturbances modifies deer perceptions of predation risk, generating predictable spatial patterns in deer antipredator behavior and the effects of deer herbivory on plant communities. Her research also evaluates the role of mammalian carnivores as seed-dispersal agents. She has discovered that the non-consumptive effects of coyotes on rodent behavior improve post-dispersal seed survival of coyote-dispersed seeds and that Channel Island foxes are effective seed-dispersal agents. During her final year in graduate school with the support of the Shadle Fellowship, she has created a predictive framework for understanding how vertebrate social behavior mediates seed dispersal (in press at Ecology Letters) and is experimentally evaluating how coyote social interactions affect individual coyote foraging decisions. 

2021 ASM Fellowship Recipient

The ASM Fellowship is the highest award made to a graduate student member of our Society. The award is intended to recognize current outstanding accomplishments in mammalogy, service to ASM, as well as the potential for a productive, future role in professional Mammalogy. The recipient of the 2021 American Society of Mammalogists Fellowship is Dana Green of the University of Regina

Dana Green has been a member of the ASM since 2015, and has attended every in-person meeting since joining the society. She was elected as a student representative for the ASM in 2017, and elected as a regular BOD member in 2020. Additionally she serves on the Informatics and Conservation Committee, and in 2021 was asked to join the ASM Vision Committee.  Along with the ASM Fellowship, Dana has been the recipient of the ASM Student in Science Policy Award, the E.O. Wilson Conservation Award from the Animal Behaviour Society, and funded a three year project through Environment and Climate Change Canada. Dana has published in journals such as the Journal of Mammalogy and Comparative Physiology among others, and a book chapter in 50 Years of Bat Research.

Dana’s thesis work focuses on understanding the community ecology and movements of migratory bats in North America. The hoary (Lasiurus cinereus) and silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans) can both migrate long distances, however they are not closely related and exhibit differences in wing morphologies indicative of foraging behaviour, suggesting that they occupy different niches in their ecosystems. Dana’s research will answer two questions: 1) How do two migratory bats partition resources to meet their requirements? 2) Are bats using landscape-level features to navigate for migration?

Streaming Presentations 

ASM Members can log into the Business Office site and stream presentations from past winners!

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MAMMALOGISTS FELLOWSHIP IN MAMMALOGY

A single graduate fellowship in mammalogy is provided annually by the Board of Directors of ASM at the recommendation of the Grants-in-Aid Committee. The amount of the award for the academic year 2019-2020 has been set at $20,000. The fellowship is intended to recognize current accomplishments in mammalogy, service to ASM, and the potential for a productive, future role in professional mammalogy. Applicants may be any graduate student members of ASM enrolled at a college or university for the forthcoming academic year and engaged in research in mammalogy. See the grants page for current application, instructions, and submission dates.

  • Curriculum vita - 3-5 pages in length, but must include the following sections; peer-reviewed publications; other publications; presentations to professional meetings; research grants; memberships in professional societies; honors and awards; professional service
  • Arrange for three letters of recommendation to be sent to asmfellow@mammalsociety.org. One letter must be from your research advisor. Please make sure your advisor and other providers of letters of recommendation include your name in the subject line of the e-mail.
  • Names and contact information for 3 people who you have asked to provide letters in support of your applications (one of these must be your present research advisor) plus name and contact information for your department head or chairperson.
  • Summary of professional experience in mammalogy, research interests, and career goals. Limited to 1 page.
  • Abstract for thesis or dissertation research. Limited to 150 words.
  • Brief statement describing how you would use any support from ASM. Limited to 1 page.
  • Description of thesis or dissertation research project organized under the following headings: Title, Introduction, Objectives, Methods, Present Status of the Research (including preliminary results), Significance, and Literature Cited. Limited to 5 pages, double spaced, however, Literature Citations may be included on additional pages.

ALBERT R. AND ALMA SHADLE FELLOWSHIP IN MAMMALOGY

A single graduate fellowship in mammalogy is provided annually by the Albert R. and Alma Shadle Endowment Fund. The award is made by the Buffalo Foundation at the recommendation of the Grants-in-Aid Committee of ASM. Generally, the award is approximately $4,000. The fellowship is intended to promote a professional career in mammalogy by allowing the recipient greater freedom to pursue research, but is not a grant in support of a specific research project. Applicants must be enrolled as graduate students in a college or university in the United States for the forthcoming academic year and be engaged in research in any area of mammalogy. See the grants page for current application, instructions, and submission dates.

  • Curriculum vita - 3-5 pages in length, but must include the following sections; peer-reviewed publications; other publications; presentations to professional meetings; research grants; memberships in professional societies; honors and awards; professional service
  • Arrange for three letters of recommendation to be sent to shadle@mammalsociety.org. One letter must be from your research advisor. Please make sure your advisor and other providers of letters of recommendation include your name in the subject line of the e-mail.
  • Names and contact information for 3 people who you have asked to provide letters in support of your applications (one of these must be your present research advisor) plus name and contact information for your department head or chairperson.
  • Summary of professional experience in mammalogy, research interests, and career goals. Limited to 1 page.
  • Abstract for thesis or dissertation research. Limited to 150 words.
  • Brief statement describing how you would use any support from ASM. Limited to 1 page.
  • Description of thesis or dissertation research project organized under the following headings: Title, Introduction, Objectives, Methods, Present Status of the Research (including preliminary results), Significance, and Literature Cited. Limited to 5 pages, double spaced, however, Literature Citations may be included on additional pages.

GRANTS-IN-AID OF RESEARCH

Awards are made available by the Board of Directors of the Society in amounts not to exceed $1500.00 (US) to graduate and upper-level undergraduate students who are members of the Society at the time of application. Awards primarily will be for support of field or laboratory work in any area of mammalogy, or for the purchase of supplies and small items of equipment related to such research. See the grants page for current application, instructions, and submission dates.

  • Research Proposal - limited to 2 pages, 12 pt font, 0.5" margins. Literature Cited may be on a separate page.
  • Itemized budget for the proposed work. Travel to meetings, salary, and living expenses will not be supported.
    • Categorize each item as Equipment, Supplies, or Travel
    • Indicate expected source of funds (ASM, Sigma Xi, etc.) and indicate with an "X" if a commitment has been made for that item.
    • Give estimated total cost and amount requested from ASM.
  • Arrange for one letter of recommendation from your research advisor to be sent to ASM via a link that will be provided to them in an email (you must supply an email address).
  • If you have received a Grant-in-Aid of research previously, you will have to provide the year it was awarded, title of the proposal, amount awarded, status of any resulting publications, and a brief summary of progress.
  • For the file attachments, please use this naming convention: "LAST NAME _ DOCUMENT TYPE" (ex. Smith_Proposal.doc, Smith_Budget.doc, Smith_GIA.doc ). 

ALBERT R. AND ALMA SHADLE FELLOWSHIP

presented by the Buffalo Foundation to a student enrolled in a university/college in the United States to promote a professional career in mammalogy by allowing the recipient greater freedom to pursue research

1970-1979

  • 1972—James Joule, University of Houston;
  • 1972—William J. Bleier, Texas Tech University
  • 1973—Philip D. Gingerich, Yale University
  • 1974—Patricia W. Freeman, University of New Mexico
  • 1975—Thomas J. O’Shea, Northern Arizona University
  • 1976—John L. Hoogland, University of Michigan
  • 1977—Ira F. Greenbaum, Texas Tech University
  • 1978—Kenneth D. Rose, University of Michigan
  • 1979—Peter V. August, Boston University

1980-1989

  • 1980—Michael A. Bowers, University of Arizona
  • 1981—Gary G. Kwiecinski, Cornell University
  • 1982—W. Christopher Wozencraft, University of Kansas
  • 1983—Duke S. Rogers, University of California, Berkeley
  • 1984—Craig S. Hood, Texas Tech University
  • 1985—Robert M. Sullivan, University of New Mexico
  • 1986—Cynthia E. Rebar, Kansas State University
  • 1987—Kimberlyn Nelson, Harvard University
  • 1988—Ronald A. Van Den Bussche, Texas Tech University
  • 1989—Brett R. Riddle, University of New Mexico

1990-1999

  • 1990—Robert D. Bradley, Texas Tech University
  • 1991—Craig L. Frank, University of California, Irvine
  • 1992—Jennifer K. Frey, University of New Mexico
  • 1993—James W. Demastes, Louisiana State University
  • 1994—Douglas A. Kelt, University of New Mexico
  • 1995—Theresa A. Spradling, Louisiana State University
  • 1996—Dawn M. Kaufman, University of New Mexico
  • 1997—Link Olson, University of Chicago
  • 1998—Thomas Risch, Auburn University
  • 1999—Jay F. Storz, Boston University

2000-2009

  • 2000—Sara Kathleen Lyons, University of Chicago
  • 2001—Steven R. Hoofer, Oklahoma State University
  • 2002—Christine L. Hice, Texas Tech University
  • 2003—Antoinette J. Piaggio, University of Colorado, Boulder
  • 2004—Jacob R. Goheen, University of New Mexico
  • 2005—Sergio Solari, Texas Tech University
  • 2006—Ryan Norris, University of Vermont
  • 2007—Paul Velasco, University of Illinois, Chicago
  • 2008—Andrew Edelman, University of New Mexico
  • 2009—Brandi Coyner, Oklahoma State University

2010-2019

2020+

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MAMMALOGISTS FELLOWSHIP

presented to a student in recognition of current accomplishments in mammalogy, service to ASM, and the potential for a productive, future role in professional mammalogy

2000-2009

  • 2001—Richard D. Stevens, Texas Tech University
  • 2002—Andrew McAdam, University of Alberta
  • 2003—Debra M. Shier, University of California, Davis
  • 2004—Kristofer M. Helgen, South Australia Museum, Adelaide
  • 2005—Jacob R. Goheen, University of New Mexico
  • 2006—Sergio Solari, Texas Tech University
  • 2007—Justin Boyles, Indiana State University
  • 2008—Jacob Esselstyn, University of Kansas
  • 2009—Jonathan Pauli, University of Wyoming

2010-2019

2020+

GIA Recipients

2020+