Open Access Articles

Solitary carnivores in the family Mustelidae are thought to exhibit pronounced intrasexual territoriality, defending space against competitors but tolerating members of the opposite sex. Although must...
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Katie M. Moriarty, Mark A. Linnell, Brandon E. Chasco, Clinton W. Epps, & William J. Zielinski. 2017. Using high-resolution short-term location data to describe territoriality in Pacific martens. Journal of Mammalogy 98(3):679-689.
Carnivores exhibit strong interspecific competition and partition niche axes to minimize agonistic interactions. Niche partitioning, though, is contingent upon resource heterogeneity, and recent lands...
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Philip J. Manlick, James E. Woodford, Benjamin Zuckerberg, & Jonathan N. Pauli. 2017. Niche compression intensifies competition between reintroduced American martens (Martes americana) and fishers (Pekania pennanti). Journal of Mammalogy 98(9):690-702.
Rapidly changing environmental conditions are influencing distributions of wildlife species in Alaska. Due to strict physiological requirements, the distribution of American martens (Martes americana)...
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Andrew P. Baltensperger, John M. Morton & Falk Huettmann. 2017. Expansion of American marten (Martes americana) distribution in response to climate and landscape change on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. Journal of Mammalogy 98(3):703-714.
Effective conservation of insular populations requires careful consideration of biogeography, including colonization histories and patterns of endemism. Across the Pacific Northwest of North America, ...
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Natalie G. Dawson, Jocelyn P. Colella, Maureen P. Small, Karen D. Stone, Sandra L. Talbot & Joseph A. Cook. 2017. Historical biogeography sets the foundation for contemporary conservation of martens (genus Martes) in northwestern North America. Journal of Mammalogy 98(3):715-730.
Monitoring demographic and genetic parameters of reintroduced populations of endangered species is essential for evaluating and informing conservation strategies to maximize the chances of a successfu...
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Stephanie M. DeMay, Penny A. Becker, Janet L. Rachlow & Lisette P. Waits. 2017. Genetic monitoring of an endangered species recovery: demographic and genetic trends for reintroduced pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis). Journal of Mammalogy 98(2):350-364.
Seasonal reliance on plant-based resources is very uncommon in temperate insectivorous bats. The pallid bat (Antrozous pallidus) is an exception and in the Sonoran Desert switches from an arthropod-ba...
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Jaclyn R. Aliperti, Douglas A. Kelt, Paul A. Heady, III & Winifred F. Frick. 2017. Using behavioral and stable isotope data to quantify rare dietary plasticity in a temperate bat. Journal of Mammalogy 98(2):340-349.
Predation by large carnivores is a dominant factor shaping wildlife communities and an understanding of local foraging strategies of predators is central to the management of wildlife populations. Inf...
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Dominique E. Watts & Seth D. Newsome. 2017. Exploitation of marine resources by wolves in southwestern Alaska. Journal of Mammalogy 98(1):66-76.
Larger predators can affect smaller predators through intraguild predation and competition, which in turn could have indirect effects on other consumers. We investigated whether gray wolves (Canis lup...
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David G. Flagel, Gary E. Belovsky, Michael J. Cramer, Dean E. Beyer, Jr. & Katie E. Robertson. 2017. Fear and loathing in a Great Lakes forest: cascading effects of competition between wolves and coyotes. Journal of Mammalogy 98(1):77-84.
We examined geographic trends in 4 morphological data sets (both craniodental and colorimetric measurements and scores of cranial foramina and qualitative craniodental variables) within and among 5 su...
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James L Patton & Christopher J Conroy. 2017. The conundrum of subspecies: morphological diversity among desert populations of the California vole (Microtus californicus, Cricetidae). Journal of Mammalogy 98(4):1010-1026.
The genus Glaucomys (New World flying squirrels) is currently considered to be comprised of 2 species, the northern flying squirrel (G. sabrinus) and the southern flying squirrel (G. volans)...
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Brian S Arbogast, Katelyn I Schumacher, Nicholas J Kerhoulas, Allison L Bidlack, Joseph A Cook, & G J Kenagy. 2017. Genetic data reveal a cryptic species of New World flying squirrel: Glaucomys oregonensis. Journal of Mammalogy 98(4):1027-1041.